Remnants ‎– Vacant Corridor

Remnants Vacant Corridor MC Found Remains 2019

Remnants are a project I am unfamiliar with, but is a solo project of Ryan Marino who has issued over a dozen releases issued since 2010. While I am not sure how this latest release it compares to earlier output, this is a pro-printed cassette mini-album which features four tracks over 28 minutes.

Being an exercise in minimalist abstracted noise, Vacant Corridor delivers four tracks muted widescreen soundscapes with a forlorn, grey hued and nostalgic atmosphere. Vacant Corridor I displays this aesthetic and in being dour more than overtly dark in mood, the feel is of quiet contemplation. An archaic atmosphere is then implied through the title The Drawing Room, Autumn, 1918, and evoked a series of layered minimal loops deliver shimmering, creaking and crackling textures which ebb and flow throughout, while late in the track a muted melody makes an appearance, which itself seems to bend and warp out of time (akin to a stretched reel to reel tape being played). Vacant Corridor II brings more dusty (and dusky) drones, creaking doors and general haunted muted urban resonances. Into Memory (Stalker) is the final track, where I assume the title is a nod to Andrei Tarkovsky’s 1979 film Stalker. With a continuation of the grey hued and archaic tinged atmosphere, muffled echo holds equal position to distant melodic elements including abstracted synth washes, semi-buried sporadic piano chords and late track sparse guitar melody.

Delivering equal parts moody and mysterious (and coupled with an undercurrent seemingly implying existential dread), Vacant Corridor is a subtle but sonically nuanced release. Likewise by effectively replicating the atmosphere and visual aesthetic of Stalker in musical form, makes for a very worthwhile listening experience.

Institution D.O.L. – Our Love Can Destroy This Whole Fucking World

Institution D.O.L. – Our Love Can Destroy This Whole Fucking World CD TORM Ent. 2019

Three years on from 2016’s Exzess (reviewed here), Institution D.O.L. have returned with a new album and which features a title previously utilised as a manifesto tag line on the last release. To then mention some early pre-release promotion, I remember reading that this would be the final album from the project, but I am also not sure on the current validity of that statement. But onward with the review.

In wasting no time, Invocation blasts forth from the speakers with loud and digitally crisp industrial textures, which are counterpointed by (sampled?) religious choirs and chants and dour organ melody. Throbbing oscillations then characterizes We Are The Black Ones, mixed with a decent dose of echo and raw junk metal crunch and shattering glass, while processed vocals and samples of crowd riots and gunfire ratchet up tension. Structured around mechanized loops and sharp spitting textures You Are All Lost, these tones bleed into the following Abschlachtung, but which is differentiated by deep melancholic sub-orchestral synth pads which underscores the majority of the track. Absolute Hell delivers more heady power electronics, which sonically spans the both rough and clean sonic textures, yet the latter half deviates completely though the use of a tragic toned piano line, which is offset with an evangelical preacher sample. In Dust and Death is by far the most rhythmic track on offer, but it is of a crude and simplistic style and not at all of a dance floor ‘rhythmic industrial’ type, while the title track rounds out the album and is the longest offering by far at twelve minutes. The first segment features brooding overblown noise and cavernous echo, but by the two minute mark the piece opens out into widescreen cinematic tones synths and from the five minute mark shifts to a beautifully melancholic piano melody which extends through to the end of the album (with only subtle noise sweeping and panning in the background). Perhaps the only slight drawback of this track are the vocals, where the emotional overwrought style of delivery detracts from the overall mood, although I am clearly missing the meaning of the words as they are being spoken in Austrian.

As with earlier albums the production sound is top notch but at only 37 minutes this is a very short and to the point album. But even so, it crams a wide variety of styles and sounds into the mix, while still managing to sound as a cohesive whole. Certainly being a solid album, if you have liked prior output of Institution D.O.L, you would no-doubt like this.

Code Neda – Tomorrow Double The Body Count

Code Neda – Tomorrow Double The Body Count MC Unrest Productions 2018

For context, Code Neda’s debut tape from 2017 can be broadly bracketed under a death industrial sound tinged with ritual heavy electronics (reviewed here). However, on this follow up it features a more direct heavy electronics sound, where ten track make up an album length tape.

The streamlined approach is immediately evident when the opening track The Devil and the Child bursts forth from the speakers with grinding bass emissions, sweeping static and heavily processed/ morbidity toned vocal proclamations. System is another display of honed simplicity, with a central mechanised ‘beat’, blended with layered bass pulsations and again with the treated vocals. In its maintenance of a strikingly direct  heavy electronics approach, sonic variation is delivered with air-raid sirens (Europe Was Lost), corkscrew spiralling drones (Jackie Duddy), subdued power-electronics menace (Confession) and fast-paced rhythmic pulsations (Blood On Your Hands), while the tape concludes with the subdued Bloody Ritual with is stilted and repetitive loops and morbid vocalisations.

Clearly Unrest Productions is pretty much a perfect label for material of this fare, and while clearly working within the broader parameters of its chosen genre, Code Neda has demonstrated a wealth of ideas and skill of sonic execution which makes for a excellently honed heavy electronics release. Pro-printed tape and cover round and the physical packaging. You know what to do.