Trepaneringsritualen ‎– Kainskult

Trepaneringsritualen Kainskult LP Tesco Organisation 2017

Some three years on from 2014’s Perfection & Permanence (reviewed here), Thomas Ekelund has returned with the follow up full length Kainskult, issued via the cult industrial label Tesco Organisation. Sonically speaking this new album demonstrates the further honing and refinement of the evolved rhythmic song-based approach, where everything about Kainskult feels as it has been stepped up a notch: from the song writing; to vocal delivery; to recording; and finally to the production. Yet with reference to the production, it is far from being clean and polished as it maintains harshness and grit befitting of its chosen ritual death industrial style, so is more a case that all elements have been elevated in sonic intensity. The methods of recording also illustrates the use of programmed elements blended with real instrumentation such a s standing drum kit (floor tom and cymbals), junk metal type percussion, distant ceremonial horns and other ritual percussion, while the vocals are on occasion multi-tracked, or presented as a backing chorus.

With a distant gruff voice proclaiming “Fratricide! Fratricide! Fratricide!”, Death & Ecstasy opens the album which is a vocal led number set to a minimalist rhythmic thump and with the semi chanted vocals comes across as a mantra of sorts. With this relative slow burner as the album opener, it only functions to amplify the impact of Maðr Malformed which is heavily driving piece based around rolling militant percussion, swaying bass rhythm and gruff vocals following a perhaps now trademark verse/ chorus/ verse format. All Flesh Has Corrupted is also noteworthy for the lyrical approach where the multi-tracked vocals are rhythmically delivered to follow the bass and ritual drumming. One of the longest tracks of the album (at 7 minutes) is which sits towards a soundscape styled offering, although bass and slow pounding drums provides a ritualized framework, while the following pairing of Feral Me and Serpent Seed demonstrates the album in its strongest song-based format. Feral Me features some fantastic roiling metallic percussive elements, while Serpent Seed is by far the album standout, with its monolithic pounding bass, counterpointed clanging metallic beat, and gruff multi tracked vocals which again demonstrates Thomas’s skill in executing vocal delivery which perfectly melds within the tracks percussive and rhythmic structure. An Immaculate Body Of Water is another 7 minute track, and while it is effectively double the length of the majority of tracks, it does not feel as long as this even with its slow pacing, where grinding drones, slow bass thuds and garbled vocals are the order of proceedings. With a blink and miss it length of at 29 seconds, the album concludes with V V V, being one final song based percussive rhythmic based track, again with thick bass drones and militant rolling beats.

Thematically speaking, the title of the album clearly alludes to the continuation of an esoteric and symbolic exploration of the Cain and Abel mythology, which is also reflected strongly in both in lyrics and visuals. It would then seem there is further meaning embedded in the cover artwork, yet I have yet been able to decipher the clues within select lyrical symbolism and typographic design to determine what the hidden message may be. But aside from such conundrums, this review has been written some months after the original release in October, 2017, where it was then observed that the first edition issued in 250 copies each of black and white vinyl pressing sold out at lightening speed, and has since been repressed in a red vinyl edition (500 copies). Based on those sales this obviously evidences that Kainskult has been a very popular album, but perhaps it is also indicative of interest being shown outside of the core underground post-industrial scene. This can then be explained by the fact that Trepaneringsritualen have toured extensively as a support act with a number of underground black metal bands, which is likely to have fostered a diversification of a typical audience for this sort of material. Likewise, given the occult and esoteric thematic focus and the strong rhythmic song based approach, it is easy to appreciate why black metal listeners would find a certain affinity with Kainkult. But regardless of where the current audience interest in Trepaneringsritualen is coming from, this is ultimately irrelevant to the fact that Kainkult functions as an expertly crafted, stormer of an album.

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Genocide Organ – Civilzation

Genocide Organ – Civilzation 3xLP Tesco Organisation 2017

In the ongoing re-release campaign of Genocide Organ’s back catalogue, the time has finally come for Save Our Slaves to receive due attention, with this expanded compilation format already having been many years in the making. Save Our Slaves was first released on Tesco Organisation in 1991 (as Tesco04, and now already 26 years old), and is the central element to this re-release. In context of Genocide Organ’s discography Save Our Slaves arrived as the second album for Genocide Organ and followed their debut Leichenlinie released 2 years prior in 1989. Although the impact of Leichenlinie in undeniable in first establishing the group, Save Our Slaves stands out as a landmark release that cemented Genocide Organ’s cult underground status and particularly highlighted their willingness to present potentially controversial thematic material without explanation or qualification.

Noting that the original format of Save Our Slaves contained a 12”LP & 7”EP (six tracks totaling around 35 minutes of music), rather than simply re-releasing that material Civilization constitutes a complete re-contextualization of original content. Here the set has been substantially expanded with the inclusion of the two tracks from 1998’s Klan Kountry 7”EP, and a further 5 tracks taken form various compilations from 1991 to 1997, along with a further LP that documents the audio of a live performance from 1990. Cleverly all additional content is conceptually tied together by having a similar American thematic focus, the original title has been altered to Civilisation, which itself takes its title from the live performance video Save Our Slaves: The Rise Of American Civilization, which was only included with the ultra limited special steel and cement version of Save Our Slaves (limited to a mere 18 copies).  Thus, with the inclusion of additional material spanning the years of 1990 to 1998, it functions to seamlessly ties together these scattered thematic threads under the Civilzation banner.

With reference to musical content, obviously Genocide Organ’s prototype, aggressive, and barely restrained power electronics forms a large proportion of the musical scope, which involves rumbling noise, blasting static, loosely composed oscillating forms, and antagonistic distortion drenched vocals (i.e. Kill Useless Nations, Klan Kountry & We Grow). Alternatively other tracks function to cover the industrial-noise styled approach of the group, such as is displayed on Patria Y Libertad, Search for a Place to Die & Violent Coordinating Committee. Likewise the throbbing rhythms, cinematic synths, squelching noise, and sweeping drones of selected compositions see Genocide Organ operating at their most melodic, such is the case with I Want James Meredith & Weg Der Verlorenen). Last of all, John Birch Society (a highly recognisable track within Genocide Organ’s canon), is a clear standout with its simplistic structure, crude but almost upbeat programmed drum machine, aggressive distorted vocals, and further treated with with harsh noise.

On the third live LP Live At Lever Sunlicht / Mannheim 15.12.90, this is the audio from the Save Our Slaves: The Rise Of American Civilization VHS, where the production is raw and harsh as one might expect for a live recording from 1990. Yet despite the harshness of the sound, the set list does not constitute an all-out jugular attack, but rather it opts for a series of industrial noise soundscapes, vague shuddering factory rhythms, squelching noise, and snarled vocalisations. The final chaotic triptych rounds out the live recording and, in the process, amps up the mood more towards an expected power electronics assault with Patria Y Libertad.

For the packaging and presentation, no attempt as been made to recreate the special format of the original box-set, which was a rough painted, hand assembled cardboard box with banderole striping and image and text panels, and additional inserts. Here an entirely new box-set design has been devised, which involves a newly designed outer slip box in which three single LP’s/ jackets are housed, along with a fourth LP jacket to house the 24 page A4 booklet* (which fleshes out the thematic context), along with a series of three printed inserts and a woven patch. With the presentation following Genocide Organ’s recognisable design aesthetic, and while completely different to the original Save Or Slaves presentation does absolute justice to the expanded set.

Considering its original impact in 1991, coupled with its revered status today, Save Our Slaves stands out as the landmark release that definitively executed each hallmark element of sound, visuals and strong and uncompromising thematic content with flawless accuracy. As a re-contextualized version of this Genocide Organ classic, Civilization can easily be categorisaed as another celebrated addition to their illustrious discography. Already sold out in its vinyl version (limited to 500 copies), a double CD, A5 sized cover and 24 page booklet* housed in an outer slip-case will have to suffice.


*  – in full disclosure, I was asked by the group to write a separate article about this box-set. Parts of that text were used as the promotional text for this release, and short fragments of it were also used in the booklet to provide further thematic context.

Salford Electronics – Communique No.2

Salford Electronics – Communique No.2 CD Tesco Organsiation 2017

Now that The Grey Wolves have ceased activity, former member Dave Padbury will be continuing in solo guide under the Salford Electronics moniker. In then noting that Salford is a suburb of Manchester, UK it may be reasonable to assume this is where Dave resides and it has duly informed the project title.

Perhaps of note, this debut Salford Electronics album was released a couple of months before The Grey Wolves final album Exit Strategy (reviewed here). Now having had a chance to listen to both albums in detail, there appears to be clear conceptual linage between the two (and perhaps this observation better frames Exist Strategy as being an album strongly influenced by the current sonic mind sent of Dave as evidenced on Communique No.2). Likewise, with reference to the soundtrack/ soundscape style of Exit Strategy, this mood also threads through Communique No.2 albeit in a far more controlled and ambient guise. The promo blurb also draws such parallels given its description of: “Salford Electronics is the follow up to The Grey Wolves – Communique 2 is a perfect Interzone eternal night noise or neon rain-soaked stalker science fiction vibrations for would-be blade runners, A soundtrack to the hollow hours empty of sleep”. Although ultimately differing in sonic execution, Communique 2 and Exist Strategy are two albums which work rather well together, given they explore similar thematic territory, but with slightly differing sonic result.

Given that Communique No.2 spans 41 minutes across ten interlinking tracks, it is best taken as a complete musical work. As such it is an album that is darkly moody and which sonically articulates a dystopian malaise of the dead hours of night, where the atmospheric industrial-noise/ dark ambient  soundscapes slowly ooze forwards in a minimalistic and cinematic guise. Here darkly moody elongated drones mix with sparse washes of noise, buzzing distortion, semi-buried rhythmic elements, but all the while maintaining a controlled and minimalist tone. But not being of studio construction alone, Prestwich is constructed around dank urban field recordings, minimalist electronics pulses and semi-buried radio chatter. Yet to speak of differences, This Sickness positioned at the centre of the album differs from the bulk of the album given its programmed/ electronic rhythmic structure.

With the effective ‘non-existent’ album artwork giving no visual reference points, it functions to redirect all focus on the musical framework, which reveals a highly detailed work of dank minimalist atmospherics and interspersed with occasional moments of biting tensile sonics. The fact that such a strong solo project has emerged from the ashes The Grey Wolves should be welcomed news, and hopefully bodes well for more high caliber material being delivered by Dave Padbury via the Salford Electronics moniker. Recommended.

The Grey Wolves – Exit Strategy

The Grey Wolves – Exit Strategy LP Tesco Organisation 2017

So here we are, 14 years on from the last official Grey Wolves album Division released in 2003. Being many years in the making, Exit Strategy has also been announced as the final album from this long standing and rather revered group, with its release also coinciding with their final live ‘action’ at Tesco Organisation’s 30th Anniversary show in Mannheim in October, 2017. So as the saying goes, “all good things must come to an end” – and end they have, but not before this ‘exist strategy’ was devised.

Having spent some time becoming acquainted with Exit Strategy, from the outset there is no way of getting around the fact that the sound of the album is not representative of what would typically be expected from The Grey Wolves. This comment is then made in full acknowledgement that the project has over their 30+ years of activity covered a diverse range of sounds, which has included: atmospheric dark ambient; murky industrial noise; and harsh power electronics. However much of the perception of Exist Strategy not sounding like The Grey Wolves comes down the general cleanliness of the sound and the clarity of the production.  This situation would then seem to be somewhat explained by the album’s liner notes that: “Exit Strategy was produced, mixed, mastered with additional audio and artwork by Jerome Nougaillon” (aka Propergol – and perhaps tellingly if Exist Strategy were played to me without being told who it was, chances are I would have said it sounded like the sharp and clinical approach employed by Propergol). So, although far from confirmed, I suspect that Jerome had a central role in the creation of this album, and this may have gone as far as being responsible for reworking and finalising a range of source material and/ or unfinished tracks from the group. Whether or not the truth on how the album was completed comes to light, remains to be seen.

To then speak of the album’s construction and flow, it is an instrumental and soundscape oriented in style and approach. A heavy dystopian mood and cinematic atmosphere permeates the album, where this perception is duly confirmed by the promo blub which states: “The soundtrack to an as yet unmade Hong Kong splatter movie. A seemingly endless march through cinematic urban decay. The original sound reduced to its basic structure through loops, repetition, distortion and other alienation techniques. it’s time to think about an Exit Strategy. The sodium orange hours of the city make you believe in the apocalypse”. Yet given the ‘soundtrack to a non-existent film’ format, there is also a conspicuous absence of the trademark vocals which are without doubt a sorely missed element. But to speak of specifics, the opening track In Our Time is a strong and tensile introduction based around pulsing textures, driving drones, a lone pounding ‘beat’ and mid-toned static shards. The Precinct then steps up a notch in urgency with a shuddering obliquely rhythmic framework with is further coupled with radio chatter for further cinematic effect. Another track worthy of individual mention is In Too Deep with it scattered sweeping textures and sparse programmed ‘Morse-code’ type rhythm.  Seizure then deviates completely from a recognized sound, given its hard pounding programmed beats and static blasts resembles a type of industrial techno along the lines of Alberich (and for this reason alone is likely to be the most divisive track on the album). In rounding out the album Flatline uses a prominent movie dialogue sample of Samuel L Jackson, and while for me personally it negatively jars the overarching mood and would have been better excluded altogether, thankfully it is used only once and not repeated (as often dialogue samples tend to be in this type of music). Sonically speaking this track is a tensile blend of jarring (digital?) noise, sporadically rhythmic outbreaks and doom addled atmospheric drones.

Although this review may on face value appear to be overly critical, such commentary should be taken more as observations which highlight the clear differences between initial expectation and the actual reality of the final The Grey Wolves album. Ultimately Exist Strategy IS a strong and enjoyable album in its own right, but can only be acknowledged after getting over the initial expectations of what you may want it to be. So, if you are able to divorce yourself from expectations that this album should be something like The Grey Wolves’ magnum opus, and instead simply approach it for what it is, some excellent material awaits and functions as a sort of unexpected addendum to their established and celebrated legacy.

Genocide Organ – Kahane Chai / Ke/Hil – Atopical Exercises

Here are two new Tesco Organisation releases, both of which were issued as special items as part of the Tesco Organisation 30th Anniversary Festival in October, 2017.


Genocide Organ – Kahane Chai 7”EP Tesco Organisation 2017

Any new release from Genocide Organ is welcomed news, where for this new 7”EP the group’s analysis of ‘nationalism’ in all its varied perspectives has been applied to Rabbi Kahane and his radical Israeli Orthodox Jewish ‘ultranationalist’ political party Kach, which later splintered into Kahane Chai – a hard-line Israeli militant advocating for the expulsion of Arabs from Israel. Interview samples of Rabbi Kahane are used within both tracks, where it it becomes quickly apparent to why Kach as a political organisation was barred from elections on the basis of inciting of racism against Arabs. Two dates are also printed on either side of the vinyl, which reference the date of his birthday (1 August, 1932), as well as the date of his assassination (5 November, 1990).

To speak of the music, Kahane Chai on Side A features a backbone of straight forward wavering synth loops, mixed with mid-toned squelching textures, while the vocals differ form the usual style in that that are treated in a heavy wash of blurred distortion which bleeds from the top to the bottom of the mix (and consequential picking the lyrical content becomes extremely difficult to decipher). Kach on Side B is far less aggressive than the first, featuring a lone low pulsing synth line and coupled only with interview samples and slightly treated whispered vocals, and while extremely minimal by usual Genocide Organ standards, it is still a very effective mood driven track.

Via the two short tracks Genocide Organ again demonstrate their total mastery of using the simple and/ or minimal sonic elements, but wielding them in such a way to make them sound far more powerful than the sum of their mere parts. When this then is coupled with the strong conceptual underpinnings, it makes for yet another excellent release in their discography.  The festival edition of 250 copies (blue vinyl), and the regular edition (black vinyl) are already sold out (as might be expected), so happy hunting if you want to track one down at a reasonable price.


Ke/Hil – Atopical Exercises 12”EP Tesco Organisaton 2017

With many lamenting the demise of Anenzephalia in 2014 (excluding the brief reformation for the live performance at Tesco 30th Anniversary), the continuation of Ke/Hil was a partial consolation given it features the same duo of Brigant Moloch and Wilhem Herich. It has been a bit of a revelation to see exactly how far the project has evolved in sound and approach from the 2010 Ke/Hil debut Hellstation.

This new three track 12″EP Atopical Exercises has followed quickly on the heals of the third album Syndrome/Antidrome (also from 2017 and reviewed here). Repulsive Appreciation leads off and sets the scene with wailing emergency sirens and a heavy and hollowed out loop, before a wonky rhythm and maudlin synth drone kicks in hard along with the apathetic yet semon styled vocals (which aligns with the established theme of social conditioning through urban design). Very much of the now established Ke/Hil heavy electronics style, this is also a pinnacle track within their catalogue.  Little Rose follows in a laid-back style, and while simple in construction, it is a very effective example of hard hitting minimalism. With a central revving ascending/ descending drone and a scattered backing of echoed junk metal elements and a muted vocals delivery (which rather than lyrics appears to be the reciting and repeating two lines of a poem). Syn/Kope features as the final track on Side B and is more akin to a sprawling death industrial style given its slow bass kick, wavering lower end textures and cavernous sonic aesthetic. While a dialogue sample also sit within the mix, it takes a secondary position to the main vocals which sit prominently front and centre, which strongly advises us to “beware the beast-man”.

A clear observation to be made is that this new 12”EP is very much a continuation of the gradual honing of the sound of Ke/Hil, and certainly bodes very well for what is anticipated to still come from the project. Limited to 250 copies and surprising that it is still available at the time of writing.


 

Con-Dom – How Welcome Is Death To I Who Have Nothing More To Do But Die

Con-Dom – How Welcome Is Death To I Who Have Nothing More To Do But Die 2LP Tesco Organisation 2016

It has to be acknowledged that the approaching this review was a completely daunting task, and consequently it has been a long time in planning due to the magnitude of doing it adequate justice.  This is Con-Dom after all, being 15 long years since 2001’s magnum opus Colour Of A Man’s Skin vinyl set.  While Mike Dando has always used the Con-Dom moniker to explore all manner of manifestations of power and control (…and domination), on this album the thematic focus has turned inwards to something far more personal, which immediately sets it apart for the usual power electronics ‘arm’s length’ presentation and exploration of thematic concepts. To cut to the core of the album, How Welcome Is Death… is Mike’s reflection on his own mother’s death; his feelings and experience during the process; an exploration of euthanasia; and an observation of the institutional suffering resulting from how society addresses terminal illness. It also burrows deep into the question of what is the value of life where the quality of living is non-existent and particularly where the awareness of the individuals own circumstance has all but been lost to diseases such dementia.  To hammer home how personal the explorations of these questions would be to Mike, the cover and booklet features a series of unflinching photos of his mother Nora, which effectively illustrates her wasting away (…and as confronting as this is visually, it does not in any way feel voyeuristic). Musically speaking the material covers 3 sides of vinyl, with the 4th side featuring an etching of the Con-Dom ‘logo’ (…a crouching man, head bowed, but with bound wrists defiantly up-stretched).  Sonically the majority of the material on offer is subdued and more low-key by usual Con-Dom standards, thereby allowing its lyrics to be spoken and fully comprehended. The tracks are further augmented with dialogue samples and short snippets of what appear to be recordings of his own mother in nursing home or hospice, which then functions to illustrate the often banal context of the suffering of many at the end of their lives.

After a short introductory and sample of a rather twee ditty of a song celebrating the elderly (Grandad You’re Lovely (Silently Falling About), the upbeat mood is quickly obliterated by Living Death; a 13 minute track of invasive droning noise and double tracked, spoken vocals. Lyrically this is delivered from the first person perspective of Nora which charts both external observations and internal dialogue. Illustrating the descent into loss of bodily control and memory, it also includes some secondary lines of text which point accusations of financial embezzlement at Mike himself (…noting that paranoia is a symptom of dementia). After another short interlude piece, the title track then emerges are more typical of Con-Dom’s sound based around a thick wall of bulldozing analogue rumble, while the vocals are spoken in an authoritarian style, as if delivering proclamations from a pulpit (…although the style of delivery is the effective opposite of the message being articulated).  The following track Chocolates features an invasive throbbing bass rumble coupled with needling noise as the basis for Mike’s world weary reading out what is effectively amounts to a statement of intent of an unidentified person to commit suicide.  Lyrically it reveals an individual suffering from an incurable terminal illness, but who has the clear resolve to take their own life on their own terms before they were physically unable to do so. T4 is another lengthy track based on animated layered noise and vocal wails bleeding in and out of the mix, is coupled with a German language vocal sample which from details of the cover relates to a 1939 letter petition seeking a mercy killing for a mother suffering from Parkinson’s Disease (…although the track’s title of T4 also references a controversial Nazi era program involving forced involuntary euthanasia). Despite the subdued sonic tone of the bulk of the album, Just Fuckin’ Die stands out based on it hard and anthemic power electronics style of fractured loops and shuddering distortion, and the only vocals on the album which elevate to the trademark flanged aggressive barrage.  The fact that this track is even included on the album, with its brutal yet strangely maudlin lyrics, is testament to the blunt and unflinching honesty Mike has shown in exploration of its theme, no matter how unpalatable the expression of a personal internalised thought may seem when spoken out loud. Following this piece is Ending (Nora), a relatively calm track, being not much more than a cavernous rumbling mass, but with the inclusion of the incoherent mutterings, this may in fact be a recording of Nora’s dying moments (…the album finally concludes in the manner in which it starts with another short sample of a twee song again celebrating the elderly).

Without doubt How Welcome Is Death… is a searing and absolutely personal exploration of questions of the value of life in the face death and the manner in which people die in the modern age. As a result it is a thematically difficult album to experience and particularly more so for anyone who has experienced a similar process with the passing of a family member. Through this album Mike show how far ahead he is conceptually and highlights the human core of what he explores through the prism of Con-Dom.  Equally How Welcome Is Death… functions to hold a mirror up to the fallacy of the oft faux celebration of strength and the overt obsession with death that preoccupies so much of the post-industrial underground.  As articulated on this album it is not ‘at a distance’ detachment; this is raw human emotion; as lived and as experienced by Mike.  How Welcome Is Death… is a brave album in its brutal honesty and although matches the level achieved on a Colour Of A Man’s Skin, for the all the reasons set out above, stands separate and apart.

Am Not – The Developing World

Am Not – The Developing World LP Tesco Organisation 2017

Based on the debut album Unpunished from 2015 (reviewed here), Am Not made a strong impact on the underground. Now two years on Tamon Miyakita returns with his follow up, but this time noting a move from the original home of Unrest Productions to Tesco Organisation.

Before providing commentary on the music, an analysis of the album’s art is warranted given the cover appears to be embedded with layered symbolism. To this end an observation to be made is that the main image showing Helios, the Greek Sun God, and based on Plato’s Republic Helios is the symbolic offspring of the idea of ‘goodness’. This image is then overlaid with a semi-transparent photo of a modern skyscraper, while the album’s title is designed backwards and can only be read properly in a mirror’s reflection. An interpretation of this combined symbolism could be as a comment on whether the principle of progress and subsequent global hegemony forms part of the greater ‘good’ of the evolution of society, or in fact should be regarded with caution by developing countries as a controlling corporate agenda with negative consequences (…although these observations may be completely off the mark and others interpretations may yield other interesting and divergent results).

To then the speak of the music, the element of surprise which was generated via Unpunished has given way to a degree of expectation for this new album. Upon first listens the same song based format and meticulous approach to the construction of the tracks is noted, but at the same time the sound palate is more varied and less sharp edged or clinical, but instead opting for a rougher and harsher tone in its blend of industrial and power electronics elements. The detached and strongly observational lyrics delivered in an apathetic or deadpan style are again a standout, although the vocals on album tracks Martyr’s Little Helper 1, Market Penetration and Beleaguered and Native II do rely on a heavily flanged treatment to excellent result. Likewise the guest vocals courtesy of Martin Wilford/ Shift on The Hunt differ by being a heady barrage of unbridled anger, functioning as another layer within the sonic framework of forceful cyclic drones, spitting static and pounding junk metal clatter. White Crimes is a particular album standout, being a contemplative piece of subdued rhythmic programming, squelching/ fluttering noise and sustained drones, as the vocals drive home its clear message within a understated but anthemic style. Perhaps then constituting the ‘hit song’ of the album, Home is a revelation, with its melodious organ drone, swaying rhythm and cyclic percussive beat and now trademark spoken vocals (…which is a thematic imagining of the People’s Republic of China welcoming Hong Kong back into the fold in 1997).

With this album Am Not clearly demonstrates a project which understands its context and linage, but has taken such a template to make an individual, forward thinking thematic approach. With a highly varied sound over its 10 tracks The Developing World is no mere retread of Unpunished, but builds upon what has come before to exceptional result. The LP version comes with a full colour A4 12 page booklet with graphics and all lyrics, and overall is clearly another high recommendation.